Is France open for tourists? Latest France travel restrictions

Is France Open for Tourists? – France Travel restrictions

If you're traveling in 2021, check which travel insurance covers COVID-19 (test and treatment abroad).

Last update: 7/11/2021

France’s borders have been open to certain EU countries since June 15, 2020 and to other countries outside the EU since July 1, 2020. Currently, however, only travelers from approved European countries and seven countries outside Europe can enter France freely.

France is one of the countries that are open for tourism but with many restrictions in place. All travelers arriving in France must have proof of a negative COVID-19 PCR test result from less than 72 hours before departure. They must also submit a sworn declaration that they do not have COVID-19, that they have not been in contact with anyone with COVID-19, and that they agree to submit to a PCR test on arrival in France.

Travelers from the seven approved countries outside of Europe must self-isolate for 7 days from their arrival in France and take a second PCR test on the 7th day of their self-isolation period.

Travelers who are not coming from approved countries can only travel to France if they have an exemption. In addition to the other entry requirements, they must complete an international travel certificate and self-isolate for 7 days from their arrival in France. On the 7th day of their self-isolation period, they must take a second PCR test.

All travelers should download the TousAntiCovid app.

Due to the current national lockdown, movement is very restricted within France. You can only travel within 10 km of your residence/accommodation during the day and you must carry proof of address with you. Therefore, we recommend against traveling to France right now.

Can I travel to France right now?

France has only reopened its borders to certain countries. Below is a map of all the countries that are currently allowed to visit France.

FRANCE - EN Placeholder
FRANCE - EN

  • Andorra
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • The Holy See
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Malta
  • Monaco
  • The Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • San Marino
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • United Kingdom
  • Afghanistan
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Armenia
  • Azerbaijan
  • The Bahamas
  • Bahrain
  • Bangladesh
  • Barbados
  • Belarus
  • Belize
  • Benin
  • Bhutan
  • Bolivia
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cabo Verde
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Canada
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Chile
  • China
  • Colombia
  • Comoros
  • Congo
  • Cote d’Ivoire
  • Costa Rica
  • Cuba
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • East Timor
  • Ecuador
  • Egypt
  • El Salvador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Eswatini
  • Ethiopia
  • Fiji
  • Gabon
  • Gambia
  • Georgia
  • Ghana
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Jamaica
  • Jordan
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kenya
  • Kiribati
  • Kosovo
  • Kuwait
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Laos
  • Lebanon
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Mali
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mauritania
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Micronesia
  • Moldova
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Morocco
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Namibia
  • Nauru
  • Nepal
  • Nicaragua
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • North Korea
  • North Macedonia
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Qatar
  • Russia
  • Rwanda
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Samoa
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Solomon Islands
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • South Sudan
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sudan
  • Suriname
  • Syria
  • Taiwan
  • Tajikistan
  • Tanzania
  • Thailand
  • Togo
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • Turkmenistan
  • Tuvalu
  • Uganda
  • Ukraine
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United States
  • Uruguay
  • Uzbekistan
  • Vanuatu
  • Venezuela
  • Vietnam
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

Travelers from these countries can only enter France for very specific reasons, such as if they are a French national, a French resident, a student in France, or a spouse or child of a French citizen.

Travelers are also allowed as transit passengers (i.e., for a layover or connecting flight) for less than 24 hours. Full information on these special circumstances is available here.

 

France COVID-19 travel restrictions and entry requirements

France’s travel restrictions are rather strict at the moment. If you are traveling from an approved European country, you need to provide proof of a negative result from a PCR COVID test that was taken less than 72 hours before your flight. You also have to complete a declaration form that states that you do not have COVID symptoms and that you agree to submit to a PCR test on arrival in France, even though you will most likely not be tested.

If you are coming from an approved country outside of Europe, you will need to present proof of a negative PCR test result from less than 72 hours before your flight and complete the declaration form stating that you do not have COVID symptoms. You will also have to self-isolate for 7 days from your arrival in France and take a second PCR test on the 7th day of your self-isolation period.

If you are traveling from another country outside of Europe, you can only enter France if you have an exemption. You must have proof of a negative PCR test result from within less than 72 hours before your departure, submit a declaration form, and complete an international travel certificate. You must also self-isolate for 7 days from your arrival in France and take a second PCR test on the 7th day of your self-isolation period.

Everyone should also download the TousAntiCovid app.

Is PCR testing mandatory to travel to France?

All travelers must have proof of a negative PCR test result that was obtained less than 72 hours before their departure.

Travelers who are not from approved European countries will take a second PCR test on the 7th day of their self-isolation period after arrival in France. Children under the age of 11 are exempt from PCR testing requirements.

Is France Open for Tourists?

Is PCR testing mandatory to travel to France?

If you cannot take a PCR test before you arrive in France, you may be able to obtain a PCR test exemption from the French embassy or consulate in your country.

Is there a mandatory quarantine upon arrival in France?

There is no mandatory quarantine for travelers from approved European countries unless they do not have proof of a negative PCR test from less than 72 hours before departure.

All other travelers must self-isolate for 7 days from their arrival in France.

Is travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage mandatory?

Travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage is not mandatory to enter France. However, it is highly recommended since, these days, it is more important than ever to look after your health and safety.

Latest France Travel restrictions

Is travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage mandatory?

According to the CDC, COVID-19 risk in France is very high, and they recommend travelers avoid all nonessential international travel to France.

If you’re traveling to France and looking for great travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage, I can’t recommend Heymondo enough. They cover both testing and treatment abroad, and they’ve helped keep us safe on our travels this year. The best part of using Heymondo is that you can get a 5% discount on their insurance just for being our reader. You can learn more about their COVID-19 travel insurance here.

COVID-19 vaccine to travel to France

Although COVID-19 vaccine distribution has begun in most countries around the world, the French government has not yet confirmed whether it will be mandatory to present a proof of vaccine record (POVR) or an international certificate of vaccination or prophylaxis (ICVP) to enter France.

If you’re going to get the COVID-19 vaccine before traveling to France, I recommend taking a copy of a vaccination record or certificate with you in case France changes its entry requirements.

Other travel restrictions for France during COVID-19

France may be open to tourists from certain countries, but there are still several precautions travelers need to follow:

  • Travelers from all countries must complete a declaration form stating that they have no COVID-19 symptoms.
  • All travelers should expect to have their temperatures checked upon arrival in France.
  • Wearing face masks in public is mandatory in most cities, including Paris.
  • Social distancing(one meter) should be practiced in all public spaces.
  • Large gatherings should be avoided.
  • Depending on your nationality, you may need a tourist visa to enter France. Check if you need one below.

What’s Open in France

Unfortunately, there aren’t a lot of places in France that are open at the moment. Hotels and airports are open, but restaurants are closed except for takeout. Attractions and museums, such as Notre-Dame Cathedral and the Louvre, are also closed, plus there is a daily “stay-at-home” curfew from 7 PM to 6 AM, so there won’t be much to do if you visit France right now.

Hotels that are open in France

Hotels in France are open, so you’ll be able to find a place to stay if you visit.

Each hotel/accommodation will have their own individual health and safety regulations, but all hotels expect guests to wear masks in public areas and social distance. There will also be frequent cleaning and disinfection of common areas and guest rooms. Hotel guests will be served food via room service for all meals, as hotel restaurants are closed.

Attractions that are open in France

Unfortunately, attractions and museums in France are closed at the moment, which means you won’t be able to see much if you visit right now. That’s why I suggest waiting to visit France if you really want to experience everything it has to offer.

Is France open for tourists? Latest France travel restrictions

Attractions that are open in France

Restaurants that are open in France

Restaurants in France are currently closed except for takeout. Bars are also closed. If you’re staying in a hotel, you will only be served via room service.

Airports that are open in France

France has many international airports, but its two biggest and busiest are Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport and Paris Orly Airport, both of which are open.

All travelers must wear masks and abide by social distancing rules. They will also have their temperatures checked upon arrival.

Curfew in France

There is currently a daily curfew from 7 PM to 6 AM. You cannot leave your residence or accommodation unless you are:

  • Commuting to/from work or school
  • Attending an emergency/necessary medical appointment
  • Assisting vulnerable people or other essential family reasons
  • Traveling by air or rail on a long-distance journey
  • Walking a pet within 1 kilometer of your residence or accommodation

If you do leave your residence/accommodation within curfew hours, you must carry a completed attestation form with you that explains your reason for leaving your residence/accommodation (it must be one of the reasons listed above). If you break curfew, you will be fined €135 for the offense and up to €1500 for repeat offenses.

Where to get a PCR test in France

Your country may require you to take a PCR test in order to fly back home. If you need to get a PCR test in France, here is a list of places you can get a PCR test.

France reopening to International Tourists – F.A.Q.

Check out these FAQs related to France reopening for tourists and let us know if you have any other questions in the comments below.

Yes, if you are traveling from an EU country, Andorra, the Holy See, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, or Switzerland, you can currently visit France freely. You can also visit France freely if you are traveling from Australia, Israel, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, or the United Kingdom.

If you are not traveling from one of these countries, you can only enter France for essential reasons or if you are a national, resident, student, spouse of a national, or child of a national.

There are currently 4,500,000+ active cases and 98,000+ deaths because of COVID-19 in France as of today. The CDC classifies travel to France as “Level 4- Very High Risk.” If you have a pre-existing condition or any health condition that could increase your chances of serious illness, you shouldn’t travel to France. Even if you are not high-risk, you should reconsider travel to France.

Yes, there are many countries that are currently banned from traveling to France. You can consult our list above to see which countries are banned.

Yes, if you are not traveling from an approved European country, you must self-isolate for 7 days from your arrival in France.

Yes, you must have proof of a negative PCR test from less than 72 hours before your departure. If you are traveling from outside of Europe, you will take a second PCR test on the 7th day of your self-isolation period.

Yes, there is a curfew in place. You are not allowed outside between 7 PM and 6 AM unless you need emergency medical care, are walking your dog, or are helping the elderly or vulnerable. The penalty for breaking curfew is €135 for the first offense and up to €1,500 ($1,750) for repeat offenses.

Yes, you can only travel within 10 kilometers of your residence from 6 AM to 7 PM and you must carry proof of address with you. You can only go further than 10 kilometers for certain essential reasons, such as essential family reasons or commuting to work. You must carry an exemption certificate with you if you are traveling further than 10 kilometers or do not have proof of address.

Yes, hotels in France have been allowed to stay open.

 

Yes, France’s airports are open at the moment. You can fly direct to Paris Charles De Gaulle from many places in Europe.

 

If you leave your residence or the place you are staying during curfew hours (7 PM to 6 AM), you will need to carry a completed attestation form with you that explains your reason for leaving your residence. There are only a few acceptable reasons to leave the place you are staying, including medical appointments and travel between work and school. If you violate these rules, you will be fined €135 for the first offense and up to €1,500 ($1,750) for repeat offenses.

The French government has closed all non-essential businesses, so bars are currently closed. Restaurants are closed except for take-out.

 

No, museums are not currently open in France. They are considered a non-essential venue, so they are closed until further notice.

No, Notre-Dame is not currently open. A devastating fire destroyed much of the cathedral on April 15, 2019, and it has been closed for renovation since.

 

No, the Louvre is closed at the moment. As a museum, it is classed as a non-essential venue, so it has been closed until further notice.

 

No, the Eiffel Tower is closed at the moment.

 

No, France is closed to American tourists at the moment.

 

No, France is currently closed to Canadian tourists.

 

Sources

This guide to France reopening for tourism will be updated with any new developments as they are reported. However, if you want more information on travel to France, you can check these official sources:

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COFOUNDER & TRAVEL JUNKIE

Hi, I'm Ascen, a globetrotter based in Philadelphia, USA. I enjoy exploring new landscapes and creating in-depth travel guides for Capture the Atlas.

I have felt a special connection with nature and all the inhabitants of the planet since I was a kid. I am passionate about discovering new countries and especially their wildlife, but no matter how many places I visit, I will always belong to the remote beaches of Almería, in Southern Spain.

You can know a little more about me here.

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