Can I travel to Malta right now

Is Malta Open for Tourists? – Latest Travel Restrictions

If you're traveling in 2021, check which travel insurance covers COVID-19 (test and treatment abroad).

Last update: 6/5/2021

Malta reopened its borders to international travel from some countries on July 1, 2020. Only travelers from designated safe corridor countries can travel to Malta right now. Malta is one of the countries that are open to tourists that uses a “traffic light” system to categorize countries, and each country category has different entry requirements.

Travelers from “green” countries do not need to take a PCR test before they travel to Malta, nor will they be subject to a swab test upon arrival. They just need to complete paper copies of the Public Health Travel Declaration Form and Passenger Locator Form and undergo thermal testing on arrival.

Travelers from “amber” countries must have a medical certificate for a negative PCR test that was obtained within 72 hours of arrival. They will also have to submit paper copies of the Public Health Travel Declaration Form and Passenger Locator Form and submit to random swab testing on arrival.

Travelers from “red” countries can only travel to Malta if they have spent at least the past 14 days in a “green” or “amber” country, or if they are Maltese citizens or residents. They should also have a negative PCR test from within 72 hours of arrival and complete paper copies of the Public Health Travel Declaration Form and Passenger Locator Form.

Can I travel to Malta right now?

Only travelers from certain countries can visit Malta right now. Below is a map of all the countries that can visit Malta at the moment.

Malta - EN Placeholder
Malta - EN

Green Countries

No countries are currently considered “green.”

Amber Countries

  • Andorra
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • China
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • Indonesia
  • Ireland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Jordan
  • Latvia
  • Lebanon
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Monaco
  • Morocco
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Rwanda
  • San Marino
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Thailand
  • Tunisia
  • Turkey
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Uruguay
  • Vatican City

Red Countries

  • Afghanistan
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Argentina
  • Armenia
  • Azerbaijan
  • The Bahamas
  • Bahrain
  • Bangladesh
  • Barbados
  • Belarus
  • Belize
  • Benin
  • Bhutan
  • Bolivia
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Botswana
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Burkina Faso
  • Burundi
  • Cape Verde
  • Cambodia
  • Cameroon
  • Central African Republic
  • Chad
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Comoros
  • Costa Rica
  • Cote d’Ivoire
  • Cuba
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo
  • Djibouti
  • Dominica
  • Dominican Republic
  • East Timor
  • Ecuador
  • Egypt
  • El Salvador
  • Equatorial Guinea
  • Eritrea
  • Eswatini
  • Ethiopia
  • Fiji
  • Gabon
  • The Gambia
  • Georgia
  • Ghana
  • Grenada
  • Guatemala
  • Guinea
  • Guinea-Bissau
  • Guyana
  • Haiti
  • Honduras
  • India
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Israel
  • Jamaica
  • Kazakhstan
  • Kenya
  • Kiribati
  • Kosovo
  • Kuwait
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Laos
  • Lesotho
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Madagascar
  • Malawi
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Mali
  • Marshall Islands
  • Mauritania
  • Mauritius
  • Mexico
  • Micronesia
  • Moldova
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Mozambique
  • Myanmar
  • Namibia
  • Nauru
  • Nepal
  • Nicaragua
  • Niger
  • Nigeria
  • North Korea
  • North Macedonia
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Palau
  • Panama
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Paraguay
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Qatar
  • Republic of the Congo
  • Russia
  • Saint Kitts and Nevis
  • Saint Lucia
  • Saint Vincent and the Grenadines
  • Samoa
  • Sao Tome and Principe
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Serbia
  • Seychelles
  • Sierra Leone
  • Singapore
  • Solomon Islands
  • Somalia
  • South Africa
  • South Sudan
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sudan
  • Suriname
  • Syria
  • Taiwan
  • Tajikistan
  • Tanzania
  • Togo
  • Tonga
  • Trinidad and Tobago
  • Turkmenistan
  • Tuvalu
  • Uganda
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Uzbekistan
  • Vanuatu
  • Venezuela
  • Vietnam
  • Yemen
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

Travelers from “red” countries can only enter Malta if they have been in a “green” or “amber” country for at least the past 14 days, or if they are Maltese citizens or residents.

 

Malta COVID-19 travel restrictions and entry requirements

Malta’s entry requirements depend on which country you are traveling from.

If you’re coming from a “green” country, you just need to submit paper copies of the Public Health Travel Declaration Form and Passenger Locator Form and undergo thermal testing on arrival.

malta

Malta COVID-19 travel restrictions and entry requirements

If you are traveling from an “amber” country, you must have a medical certificate for a negative PCR test that was obtained within 72 hours of arrival in Malta. You also have to complete paper copies of the Public Health Travel Declaration Form and Passenger Locator Form and possibly undergo a random swab test on arrival.

If you’re coming from a “red” country, you must have spent at least the last 14 days in a “green” or “amber” country or be a Maltese citizen or resident. You should also have a negative PCR test from within 72 hours of arrival and submit paper copies of the Public Health Travel Declaration Form and Passenger Locator Form.

If you’re a Maltese citizen or resident coming directly from a “red” country, you will have to quarantine for 14 days from your arrival in Malta.

Is PCR testing mandatory to travel to Malta?

It depends on the category of the country you are traveling from.

If you’re traveling from an “amber” or “red” country, you must have a medical certificate for a negative PCR test from within 72 hours of arrival in Malta. If you’re traveling from a “green” country, a PCR test is not required.

Maltese citizens or residents who have traveled from “red” countries will also have to take a second PCR test on day 7-10 of their 14-day quarantine period (if they have traveled from Brazil, South Africa, or the UK, the second PCR test must take place on day 5-7 of the 14-day quarantine period).

Is there a mandatory quarantine upon arrival in Malta?

There is no mandatory quarantine for travelers who arrive from safe corridor countries (“green” and “amber” countries). Anyone who arrives in Malta from a non-safe-corridor country or who has not spent at least the last 14 days in a safe corridor country must quarantine for 14 days from their arrival.

Malta COVID-19 travel restrictions

Is there a mandatory quarantine upon arrival in Malta?

Additionally, if you arrive from an “amber” country and do not have proof of a negative PCR test result, you may be required to quarantine on arrival in Malta.

Travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage to visit Malta

Travelers are not required to have travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage to visit Malta. Nevertheless, we highly recommend purchasing some kind of travel insurance with health coverage so that you’re covered no matter what happens while you’re traveling.

Wondering which travel insurance to buy? Heymondo is a fantastic option. Their travel insurance with COVID-19 coverage is great because it offers extensive coverage for COVID-19 testing and treatment abroad while still being affordable.

COVID-19 vaccine to travel to Malta

Currently, all travelers, even if they are vaccinated, must abide by the entry requirements for their country. However, the Maltese government has confirmed that, sometime in the near future, vaccinated travelers who present proof of full vaccination will be able to enter Malta and will be exempt from the testing entry requirement.

If you’re going to get the COVID-19 vaccine before traveling to Malta, I recommend taking a copy of a vaccination record or certificate with you in case Malta changes its travel restrictions.

Other travel restrictions for Malta during COVID-19

Malta has implemented a few other travel restrictions for visitors:

  • Travelers from “green” countries will undergo thermal testing on arrival. Travelers from “amber” countries may have a random swab test on arrival.
  • Face masks are required in all public areas.
  • Social distancing rules must be observed.
  • You may need a tourist visa to visit Malta. Check if you need one below.

What’s open in Malta

Restrictions have recently tightened in Malta, so museums and tourist sites are currently closed. Hotels, beaches, and airports are open, but restaurants are only open for takeout and delivery.

Hotels that are open in Malta

Hotels and accommodations are currently open in Malta. If you’re not sure where to stay, these accommodations are our favorites:

Hotel restaurants are currently closed so only room service or takeout is allowed.

All guests will have their temperatures checked when they enter their accommodation. They must wear masks in public areas and social distance. Hand sanitizer will be available at reception for guests to disinfect their hands. Only one person or household group can use an elevator at a time. High-contact areas will be disinfected hourly.

More information on accommodation regulations can be found here.

Beaches that are open in Malta

If you’re looking to soak up some sun, beaches in Malta are open.

What's open in Malta

Beaches that are open in Malta

Beachgoers must keep 2 meters away from others who are not in their household. Hand sanitizer will be available at the beach’s entrance for beachgoers to disinfect their hands. Beaches will be cleaned daily.

You can find more details on beach regulations here.

Attractions that are open and tours that are running in Malta

Museums and cultural sites in Malta are currently closed, but they should reopen on April 26th. Tours can still operate, but according to current restrictions, group sizes in public places are limited to 2 people, which includes the tour guide, so only individual tours are possible right now.

Museums and other cultural places have the right to refuse entry to those who look visibly unwell. Visitors’ temperatures will be checked before they enter. Visitors must wear masks and keep 2 meters’ distance away from those who are not in their household. Hand sanitizer will be available at the entrance and all visitors must sanitize their hands before entering.

For tours, visitors will have their temperatures checked and will have to sanitize their hands before the tour begins. They must wear masks at all times and social distance. Tours will be limited to 2 people, so it may be a good idea to book your tour in advance.

More information on museums and cultural attraction regulations is available here. More details on tour regulations can be found here.

Restaurants that are open in Malta

Wondering where you’ll eat while you’re in Malta? Restaurants are currently only open for delivery and takeout, but they will fully reopen on April 26th.

Restaurants are currently open until 11 PM.

Can I travel to Malta right now

Restaurants that are open in Malta

Guests must wear masks when entering, exiting, and moving around the restaurant, but they can take them off while they are seated at their table. They must also provide their contact details for contact tracing purposes and disinfect their hands when they are entering and leaving the restaurant. Hand sanitizer will be available at the entrance for this purpose.

Tables will be set up so that they are 3 meters apart and chairs are 2 meters apart.

More information on restaurant regulations can be found here, here, and here.

Airports that are open in Malta

Malta International Airport is currently open.

All travelers must wear masks and abide by social distancing rules. They will also be subject to health screenings on arrival.

Where to get a PCR test in Malta – COVID-19 testing in Malta

Your country may require you to take a PCR test in order to fly back home. If you need to get a PCR test in Malta, you can find more information on where and how to get tested here.

Malta reopening its borders to tourists – F.A.Q.

Check out these FAQs related to Malta reopening for tourists and let us know if you have any other questions in the comments below.

Yes, you can travel to Malta right now as long as your country is on this list of “green” and “amber” countries.

There are currently 600+ active cases and 400+ deaths due to COVID-19 in Malta as of today. The CDC classifies travel to Malta as “Level 4- Very High Risk.” If you have a pre-existing condition or any health condition that could increase your chances of serious illness, do not travel to Malta. Additionally, even if you are not high-risk, you might want to reconsider travel to Malta.

 

Yes, if your country is not on this list of “green” and “amber” countries and you have not been in a “green” or “amber” country for at least the last 14 days, you cannot travel to Malta.

No, you do not need to quarantine if you are coming from a safe corridor (“green” or “amber”) country.

Yes, if you’re traveling from an “amber” or “red” country, you must have a medical certificate for a negative PCR test that was obtained within 72 hours of arrival. Travelers from “green” countries do not need to take a PCR test to enter Malta.

 

No, Malta does not currently have a curfew in place.

No, there are no restrictions on intercity and interregional travel.

Yes, hotels in Malta are open.

Yes, Malta International Airport is open.

No, restaurants are currently only open for takeout and delivery, but they will fully reopen on April 26th.

 

Yes, beaches in Malta are open.

Yes, tours and excursions are operating in Malta.

No, attractions, such as museums and cultural sites, are currently closed.

 

No, Americans cannot travel to Malta right now.

Yes, Canadians can visit Malta.

Sources

We will update this guide on Malta reopening to tourism with any new developments. If you need more information on travel to Malta, you can check these official sources:

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COFOUNDER & TRAVEL JUNKIE

Hi, I'm Ascen, a globetrotter based in Philadelphia, USA. I enjoy exploring new landscapes and creating in-depth travel guides for Capture the Atlas.

I have felt a special connection with nature and all the inhabitants of the planet since I was a kid. I am passionate about discovering new countries and especially their wildlife, but no matter how many places I visit, I will always belong to the remote beaches of Almería, in Southern Spain.

You can know a little more about me here.

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