tent camping at a Valley of Fire Campground

Valley of Fire Camping Guide – Campsites, RV Camping + MAP

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Camping in the Valley of Fire is the perfect way to maximize your visit and experience all the wonders of this park. If you’ve read our guide to visiting the Valley of Fire, you’ll know that this state park is home to gorgeous geological structures and hiking trails.

Valley of Fire Camping Guide, valley of fire camping reservations

Valley of Fire Camping Guide – Campsites, RV Camping + MAP

Also, taking a trip to the Valley of Fire is one of the best things to do outside Las Vegas, and it’s a great escape from the chaotic Vegas Strip. You can take full advantage of your time here and save money by staying overnight at a Valley of Fire campsite.

In this guide, I’ll tell you everything you need to know to enjoy a Valley of Fire camping trip:

By the end of this article, you’ll be ready to camp overnight and explore all that this natural landmark has to offer!

Valley of Fire campgrounds

There are two main campsites at the Valley of Fire: Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock.

Atlatl Rock Campground

Atlatl Rock Campground at Valley of Fire is the park’s primary campsite. As the largest campground, it’s a good choice for RV camping at the Valley of Fire. Atlatl Rock also has more amenities, with flush toilets, showers, picnic tables, fire pits, grills, and spigots.

Atlatl Rock Campground, valley of fire rv camping

Atlatl Rock Campground

Half of the sites have electric hookups for trailers, and there is a dump station at the entrance. Each campsite has plenty of room for you to park your vehicle and pitch a tent.

  • Number of campsites: 44
  • Electric hookup: Yes (at half the sites)
  • Restrooms/showers: Yes
  • Dump station: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

Arch Rock Campground

Arch Rock Campground at Valley of Fire is smaller and better suited to tent camping. It was fewer facilities than Atlatl Rock, most notably vault toilets and no showers or electric hookups. There are 29 spacious campsites with picnic areas, fire pits, barbecue grills, and water spigots. Unlike Atlatl Rock, Arch Rock closes in the summer and winter.

RV camping, camping in valley of fire

Arch Rock Campground

  • Number of campsites: 29
  • Electric hookup: No
  • Restrooms/showers: Yes/No
  • Dump station: Yes
  • Pets allowed: Yes

Valley of Fire RV camping

RV camping at Valley of Fire is available at the Atlatl Rock Campground. Sites 23-44 can fit RVs, trailers, and motorhomes up to 35 feet long, so you should be fine. These sites have electric hookups, and you’ll find a dump station at the campsite’s entrance.

Arch Rock Campground, valley of fire camping reservations

Valley of Fire RV camping

Be aware that there is a $10 nightly charge for using the utility hookups.

Campground prices

Speaking of nightly rates, it’s important to note the camping fees at Valley of Fire. First, you’ll have to pay $15 to enter the park ($10 if you’re a Nevada resident), and overnight camping costs $20 per night.

Again, RV camping at the Valley of Fire costs an additional $10/night if you use the utility hookups.

Free camping at Valley of Fire

The Valley of Fire camping fees are quite reasonable and staying overnight in the park is cheaper than staying at a nearby hotel.

However, if you’re looking for free camping near the Valley of Fire, you have some options. You could camp in Valley of Fire’s BLM territory at the park’s overflow site, about six miles from the western entrance. Intended for use when the other campgrounds are full, this area is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. While it can get windy, the ground is flat and can accommodate all types of RVs.

Another option is Valley of Fire backcountry camping, although you’ll be further from the park and its campground amenities. For example, you can find dispersed camping near Valley of Fire around the Lake Mead National Recreation Area.

Valley of Fire camping reservations

The sites at each Valley of Fire campground are available on a first-come, first-served basis, so you can’t make reservations. Moreover, you can’t camp for more than 14 days in a 30-day period.

tent camping, camping near valley of fire state park

Valley of Fire camping reservations

That said, the Valley of Fire has three group-use campsites that are available only by reservation. Each group campground can accommodate 45 people, but there is no minimum. So, if you’re worried about not being able to find a spot at the Atlatl or Arch Rock campgrounds, you can call ahead to reserve a spot at one of the group campsites.

The reservation fee is $25/night per site, and the camping fee is $25/night per vehicle ($20/night for Nevada residents). You can find more information about reserving a group-use campsite on the park’s official website.

Best time to camp in Valley of Fire State Park

The ideal time to go camping at Valley of Fire State Park is in the spring and fall. The summer season gets extremely hot, which can make sleeping at the desert campsites unbearable. Moreover, the nighttime temperatures can dip quite low in the winter, and one of the campgrounds is closed during this time anyway.

best time to camp in valley of fire

Best time to camp in Valley of Fire State Park

One of the best activities to do while camping at Valley of Fire is stargazing. Since the park closes at sundown, your only way of seeing the night sky from here is to camp overnight, and it’s worth it! This is another reason why you’ll want to camp in the spring or fall, as the evening temps will be pleasant.

Valley of Fire campground map

That’s it for this Valley of Fire State Park camping guide! To make planning easier, I have a Valley of Fire campground map, which includes the Atlatl Rock and Arch Rock campsites, as well as the backcountry sites I mentioned.

Now you should be ready to plan your Valley of Fire camping trip! I hope you found this guide helpful and that you enjoy your time in this beautiful area. If you have any questions, feel free to leave me a comment below. Have a safe trip!

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COFOUNDER & TRAVEL JUNKIE

Hi, I'm Ascen, a globetrotter based in Philadelphia, USA. I enjoy exploring new landscapes and creating in-depth travel guides for Capture the Atlas.

I have felt a special connection with nature and all the inhabitants of the planet since I was a kid. I am passionate about discovering new countries and especially their wildlife, but no matter how many places I visit, I will always belong to the remote beaches of Almería, in Southern Spain.

You can know a little more about me here.

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