Guide to Blue Lagoon, Iceland - Excursions from Reykjavik - Hot springs in Iceland

Hot springs in Iceland – The 30 best thermal pools in Iceland

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Soaking in a hot spring in Iceland is one of those things that you must experience at least once in your life. Imagine relaxing in a warm bath, surrounded by snow or a spectacular green landscape, with views of Icelandic fjords and glaciers. It’s something that’s not too far from reality, especially in a country like Iceland.

We have the amazing opportunity to visit this beautiful country every year during our Iceland Photo Tours. Whether we stay in the Highlands or spend time in one of the cities, we always try to find time to go to some Iceland thermal pools. Enjoying a rejuvenating bath helps us unwind and build up strength for the rest of our journey. Fortunately, there are hot baths in most parts of the country, so it doesn’t require a detour from your planned route.

As you’ll see in our guide, there are different types of geothermal baths. Some of them are outdoor pools that require an entrance fee. These kinds of hot springs typically have specific rules and regulations for accessing the bathing area. On the other hand, there are natural pools in Iceland that don’t have an entrance fee but also don’t have the luxury of changing rooms or facilities.

In this article, I’ll tell you about the 30 best hot springs in Iceland, which include outdoor pools, natural hot springs, and others. While each of these baths are natural and heated through geothermal energy, they each have a unique feel that makes them worth visiting.

At the end of this guide, you’ll find a map of Iceland’s hot springs, which you can use to quickly locate your favorites and find the ones closest to your planned route.

1. The Blue Lagoon, one of the most visited hot springs in Iceland

The Blue Lagoon is one of the most popular and most visited lagoons in Iceland. Located in Grindavík, the seaside resort is just 20 minutes from the Keflavik International Airport and about a 45-minute drive from the capital city of Iceland, so visiting is one of the best things to do from Reykjavík.

This geothermal spa in Iceland is known for its medicinal waters, which are said to help relieve some skin ailments. Of course, this isn’t the only reason people visit! Most people go to Blue Lagoon to enjoy the relaxing atmosphere and the unique, milky-blue waters.

Blue Lagoon, a famous hot springs in Iceland

1. The Blue Lagoon, one of the most visited hot springs in Iceland

Blue Lagoon’s water temperature ranges from 99°F to 106°F, so even if you go there in the winter, I can guarantee that you won’t be too cold. The Blue Lagoon covers over 1.5 acres of space and includes modern bathing facilities, making it one of the best hot springs near Reykjavík, Iceland.

If you’re renting a car, you’ll have no problem getting to the Blue Lagoon. However, if you don’t want to drive in Iceland, you can book a transfer. If you’ve already purchased your tickets to the lagoon, this is the best transfer option. Otherwise, you can book your ticket to Blue Lagoon with a transfer from Reykjavík here. Keep in mind that the Blue Lagoon is a popular tourist spot, so it’s best to make a reservation in advance.

If you want to know more about the Iceland’s Blue Lagoon, I suggest taking a look at our travel guide.

2. The Secret Lagoon, one of the oldest hot springs in Iceland

The Secret Lagoon is one of the oldest thermal baths in Iceland and a must-see if you decide to tour the Golden Circle.

Until a few years ago, the Secret Lagoon was the calmest hot spring on the Island because it was a secret place known only by a few locals. However, a farmer recently bought the land and renovated the area to include showers and changing rooms. Since then, it has become one of the Iceland lagoons that are very popular with tourists, although it’s still quieter than the Blue Lagoon.

The Secret Lagoon, the oldest natural hot springs Iceland

2. The Secret Lagoon, one of the oldest hot springs in Iceland

The waters at the Secret Lagoon range in temperature from 100°F to 104°F throughout the year. So, even if you visit it in the middle of winter, you can bathe in a warm pool surrounded by snow. Also, the views here are magnificent, and you can soak while watching a small nearby geyser, which erupts every 5 minutes or so. During the winter, it’s a great viewing spot to see the Northern Lights.

The Secret Lagoon is one of the best pools in Iceland, so I suggest booking your ticket in advance here. The entrance fees are quite cheap, but because of this, they sell out quickly. To make your visit the most relaxing it can be, I recommend booking the reservation towards the end of your Golden Circle tour, so you have more time to enjoy it. If you aren’t renting a car in Iceland, this tour will take you around the Golden Circle and the Secret Lagoon from Reykjavík.

3. Mývatn Nature Baths, one of the best thermal baths in Iceland

Many travelers to Iceland wonder which is most worth visiting: Blue Lagoon or Mývatn. If you’re looking for a natural Icelandic pool that will help you disconnect from the masses of tourists, Mývatn is your best bet. Plus, these natural hot springs in Iceland are cheaper than the Blue Lagoon.

Mývatn Nature Baths, the best hot springs Iceland

3. Mývatn Nature Baths, one of the best thermal baths in Iceland

The Mývatn geothermal pools in Iceland are in the north, about 45 minutes from the city of Húsavík, and just over an hour from Akureyri. If you’re renting a car, you can get there by following the Ring Road. The pool’s surrounding area has high geothermal activity, which makes it one of the best thermal baths in the country. Although the waters around here can reach temperatures up to 265°F, the specific lake that forms these natural springs is 100°F on average. As a result, the waters are alkaline and rich in minerals, which makes them very beneficial for the skin. There is also a sauna on the premises, making it a full spa experience.

If you decide to visit the Lake Mývatn region, I highly suggest making a stop to relax in these natural hot baths in Iceland. You’ll be able to enjoy beautiful views of the region while soaking in clean, medicinal waters. For greater peace of mind, I recommend booking your reservation as soon as possible here.

4. Geosea Geothermal Sea Baths, the best spa in North Iceland

The Geosea sea baths are somewhat different from the more common hot springs in Iceland because they’re filled with seawater that is heated by geothermal energy. These pools are in the city of Húsavík, which has the added benefit of being known as one of the best places to see whales in Iceland.

Geosea - Geothermal Sea Baths, geothermal spa Iceland

4. Geosea Geothermal Sea Baths, the best spa in North Iceland

Water from the sea reaches this Iceland pool through two wells, and the temperature ranges from 100°F to 102°F throughout the year. Since the water originates from the sea, it is rich in salt, so these are some of the best baths for healing the skin. In recent years, these hot springs have gotten a lot of positive international press, so it’s not the most discrete choice, but still worth visiting.

Even so, the Geosea baths are considered the best geothermal hot springs in Iceland because of the views. The pools are right in front of the ocean, offering a prime opportunity to see whales and enjoy the northern lights of Iceland. This is also a great spot for gazing at the beautiful Eyjafjörður fjord. There is a cliffside edge that overlooks the Skjálfandi Bay, making for quite a unique experience.

5. Seljavallalaug, Icelandic thermal pools in a beautiful natural surrounding

Seljavallalaug is one of the oldest thermal baths in Iceland, after the Secret Lagoon. It sits at the foot of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, between the Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss waterfalls in southern Iceland. This makes it the perfect place to bathe while amidst the country’s amazing natural surroundings.

The water reaches the Seljavallalaug swimming pool through a natural stream, and the temperature depends on the season and time of year. For this reason, I suggest only visiting this thermal bath during the summer months, or in the spring if you don’t mind tepid water.

Seljavallalaug, hot spring Iceland

5. Seljavallalaug, Icelandic thermal pools in a beautiful natural surrounding

These Icelandic hot springs have two small rooms where you can leave your clothes. That said, be careful, as visitors are responsible for keeping their belongings safe and cleaning up after themselves. There aren’t any workers who oversee maintenance and upkeep, so you’ll find the facilities how the previous visitors left it. I recommend coming prepared with towels, sandals, and your bathing suit already on.

Seljavallalaug is the best hot spring in Iceland between the Seljalandsfoss and Skógafoss waterfalls, although it’s not the easiest to get to. If you want to enjoy these thermal baths for free, take the Ring Road to Route 242. Then, follow the signs and turn off onto a gravel road, where you’ll find a parking lot. You’ll have to park here and walk for about 15 minutes to get to the hot springs. The path is a bit uneven and there is a small stream to cross, but it’s not difficult, and the landscape is beautiful.

6. Reykjadalur, an Icelandic thermal river you can bathe in

Reykjadalur translates to “Valley of Steam,” and the name isn’t a coincidence. This is one of the hot springs near Reykjavík that is surrounded by great geothermal activity. Here, you’ll find one of the most famous thermal rivers in Iceland, the Reykjadalur Thermal River, which is perfect for bathing.

This shallow river has hot water due to the geothermal energy in the region, and the water temperatures hover around 104°F. Therefore, it’s one of the best natural hot springs in Iceland to visit year-round. Even during winter, you can soak in the water river while taking in the spectacular snowy landscape.

Reykjadalur, hot springs river Iceland

6. Reykjadalur, an Icelandic thermal river you can bathe in

As you can imagine, Reykjadalur is quite popular, so the government installed some dividers to make it easier for visitors to change their clothes. Even so, the entire area is outdoors, so I’ll warn you that you won’t have much privacy.

Reykjadalur is still a geothermal bath in Iceland that’s worth seeing. This impressive thermal river is less than 30 miles from Reykjavík, near the town of Hveragerði. Once you reach the Hveragerði parking lot, you’ll have to walk about 2 miles to reach the bathing area. The walk isn’t challenging at all, and the nature in the area is gorgeous, so if you like hiking, I highly recommend adding this hot spring to your route.

If you’re not going to rent a car in Iceland but you want to visit Reykjadalur, your best option is to book this tour from Reykjavik.

7. Drangsnes Hot Pots, one of the best free hot springs in Iceland

If you’re going to be in the Westfjords during your trip to Iceland, I recommend passing through the town of Drangsnes. Here, you’ll find some free hot springs in Iceland that are right by the sea.

Drangsnes is actually three small lagoons in Iceland, which you can freely access any time of day, even at night. They are open all year round, and the temperatures vary from one pool to the next. It’s a bit like playing Goldilocks because you can find the hot spring that’s most pleasing for you.

Drangsnes Hot Pots, geothermal pools Iceland

7. Drangsnes Hot Pots, one of the best free hot springs in Iceland

Although these hot springs aren’t natural, its waters are heated through the geothermal activity in the area, so they’re quite relaxing.

Also, Drangsnes is a bit different from other Icelandic thermal pools in that they’re easily accessible from the road. The three pools are lined up along the shoreline, and there are changing rooms on the other side of the road. These are also the best lagoons in Iceland for meeting locals since the place usually isn’t too crowded. Icelanders tend to be very friendly, so don’t be surprised if they strike up a conversation with you while you’re there.

8. Laugarvatn Fontana, geothermal baths in Iceland where you can relax

Laugarvatn Fontana is an Iceland hot spring resort in the heart of the Golden Circle. Many people believe that the hot steam that emanates from its soil has healing properties. The temperature of the steam, which gets pumped into some of the cabins, can range from 104°F to 122°F.

If you decide to go there, I must warn you that the extremely high humidity can be quite uncomfortable. For people who aren’t used to saunas and Turkish baths, it can become unbearable.

Laugarvatn Fontana, thermal pools in Iceland

8. Laugarvatn Fontana, geothermal baths in Iceland where you can relax

Along with the steam cabins, this geothermal pool in Iceland includes three open-air baths. Each pool varies in terms of depth and temperature, although they all contain mineral-rich waters. There is also a hydromassage bath, which provides great views of the landscape, and a steam room that’s set to a temperature range between 176°F and 194°F.

I must admit that this place has modern facilities and impressive thermal baths, which many people find quite rejuvenating. However, I don’t think this is the best hot spring in Iceland to visit if you want a more natural atmosphere. That said, if you do want to experience Laugarvatn Fontana, I recommend booking a ticket as soon as possible.

9. Hoffell, a hot spring in Iceland to go to in winter

Hoffel has one of the best hot springs in Iceland for winter travelers. The area has a total of five hot tubs, which are lined up next to each other and submerged in rock. Each pool offers magnificent views of the mountains and Hoffellsjökull glacier. I suggest visiting during winter so you can experience the breathtaking snow-covered landscape.

Hoffell, hot springs Iceland winter

9. Hoffell, a hot spring in Iceland to go to in winter

The hot pots have a bluish-green color and will totally reinvigorate you after hours of driving on the road. These thermal pools in southeastern Iceland are a great choice for those who love nature and hiking. There are hiking trails nearby, which provide stunning lookouts over the volcano and glaciers.

To access this geothermal spa in Iceland, you’ll have to pay an entrance fee. Another option is to stay at the Hoffell Guesthouse, which includes free access to the spa. If you’d like to spend the night here, I highly recommend booking a reservation in advance, since space is limited.

To get to these hot springs in Höfn, Iceland, you’ll only need to drive about 10 miles outside the city. Once you leave Höfn, take Route 1 and then merge onto Route 984 towards Glacier World Guesthouse.

10. Krossneslaug, a hot spring pool in the Westfjords, Iceland

The Westfjords in the north are home to one of the most incredible thermal baths in Iceland: Krossneslaug. Unlike the last few lagoons in this guide, Krossneslaug has a more remote location. Despite any extra travel time, it is a spring in Iceland that’s worth a visit.

Even though it’s located in one of the oldest parts of Iceland (and thus, is less affected by the geothermal activity), the waters come from a natural hot spring. The primary attraction is the pool, and there is a hot tub right next to it. Best of all, this Icelandic bath provides oceanfront views of the North Atlantic. If you go at the right time, you may even spot whales in the sea, all while soaking in the warm thermal waters.

Krossneslaug, hot springs in Iceland

10. Krossneslaug, a hot spring pool in the Westfjords, Iceland

Admission to Krossneslaug isn’t free, but it costs just a few dollars, so well worth the price. There are also practical changing rooms and a shower for your convenience.

If you want to see Iceland’s natural hot springs in the Westfjords, you can’t miss this one. That said, its location in the Westfjords makes it a bit more challenging to access. You’ll have to travel along Route 643, and it’s best to take a 4×4 since the gravel roads can be rough.

11. Hrunalaug, a hot spring in Iceland to disconnect and enjoy nature

Hrunalaug is one of those thermal springs in Iceland that began as a secret hideaway for travelers, thanks to its somewhat remote location. Today, it is a very popular place to bathe while enjoying peaceful natural surroundings.

This small, charming lagoon is in southwest Iceland and has a cozy feel. The waters are walled in by natural stones, and the spring is on private property, so it feels more secluded. That being said, it’s important that you respect the owner’s privacy and to leave the area better than you found it.

Hrunalaug, hot springs of Iceland

11. Hrunalaug, a hot spring in Iceland to disconnect and enjoy nature

The gorgeous views make this one of the top hot springs in Iceland. There is also a little hut where you can safely change clothes and freshen up. It is partially covered by the hillside, giving it a whimsical atmosphere, like The Hobbit.

Depending on the time of year you go, this thermal pool may lose its charm because of the tourist crowds. It’s best to travel in the low season to have the most relaxing bath possible.

To get to the Hrunalaug hot spring, you’ll have to keep your car in the parking lot and take a short walk to the pools. It is about a 40-minute drive from Selfoss, so if you’re traveling along the Ring Road, turn onto Route 30 and follow the signs.

12. Hellulaug, a thermal bath where you can relax in the Westfjords

Hellulaug is another Iceland hot spa in the Westfjords where you can relax and enjoy incredible views. Not only that, but you’ll have a lot more privacy than some of the other more popular thermal baths.

Located on the southern shore of the Westfjords, Hellulaug is less than half a mile from the Flókalundur hotel and campsite. It’s unnoticeable from the road, which adds to its appeal. However, it can be tricky to find since it’s somewhat hidden from view. I suggest using the Vatnsfjörður fjord as a reference point. You’ll find Hellulaug at the point where it touches the sea.

Hellulaug, the hot springs in Iceland

12. Hellulaug, a thermal bath where you can relax in the Westfjords – Clifton Wilkinson

These Iceland natural pools have an average temperature of 100°F. The baths have a maximum depth of about 2 feet, making them the best lagoons in Iceland for sitting back and taking in the views. As you soak, you’ll be right in front of the sea, on the natural beach, looking out over the fjord.

Hellulaug is open year-round and there aren’t any admission fees. This is great because it’s a budget-friendly hot spring, although it means that there aren’t luxuries like saunas and changing rooms.

Even so, the totally natural setting and concealed location make it one of those special spots in the Westfjords that you must visit.

13. Landmannalaugar, one of the most beautiful hot springs in Iceland

Landmannalaugar is one of the best thermal pools in Iceland’s Highlands, as well as one of the most impressive in the country. So, if you’re looking for one of the most mesmerizing Icelandic hot springs, this is one you can’t miss.

These Iceland lagoons are near the Brennisteinsalda campsite, which oversees a volcano and lava field. As such, Landmannalaugar’s pools have a comfortable temperature range between 97°F and 104°F. Also, this hot spring is technically a thermal river, one surrounded by spectacular colors and wilderness.

Landmannalaugar, hot springs of Iceland

13. Landmannalaugar, one of the most beautiful hot springs in Iceland

Landmannalaugar translates to “pond of the people,” and this place seems to call people from all over the country (and world!) to enjoy the soothing waters. Due to its placement near a lava field, these geothermal baths take on a colorful mix from the flowing streams nearby.

The pool is just steps away from the visitor center, and there are changing rooms too. Unfortunately, Landmannalaugar is only accessible during the summer months. Not only that, but you’ll want to go by 4×4 since the path there includes several F-roads. From the Ring Road, the easiest route is Route 26 between Hella and Selfoss. This becomes F-26, which you’ll take to F-208, and finally, Landmannalaugar.

If you don’t have the right vehicle or you prefer not to drive on F-roads, but you still want to see this geothermal pool in Iceland, I recommend this excursion from Reykjavík.

14. Nauthólsvík Geothermal Beach, a hot spring near Reykjavik

You will surely visit Reykjavík at some point during your trip to Iceland, so I suggest taking the time to see the geothermal beach of Nauthólsvík. These hot springs in Iceland feature a seaside hot tub, warm-water pool, and comfortable facilities with a café.

Nauthólsvík is one of the best thermal pools in Reykjavík and is an ideal summer getaway for many people. Here, you can sunbathe, swim in the ocean, and enjoy a beautiful day at the beach. Towel and swimsuit rentals are also available in case you forget! During the summer, entry is free, but it gets crowded quickly because it’s the high season. That said, Nauthólsvík is open year-round, and on the website, you can check the admission fees, which are just a few dollars.

Nautholsvik Geothermal Beach, Iceland hot water springs

14. Nauthólsvík Geothermal Beach, a hot spring near Reykjavik

The water temperature of the pool ranges from 86°F to 102°F. If you go on a particularly hot day, you can cool off in the sea, which typically ranges in temperature from 59°F to 66°F.

While the Blue Lagoon is more famous, Nauthólsvík is another popular hot spring in Reykjavík worth checking out. That said, it is a touristy place, so it can get quite crowded. If you’re looking for a relaxing soak, you might not find it here.

15. Viti, one of Iceland’s most popular bathing lakes

Viti is one of the most popular Iceland mineral baths in the eastern Highlands. Viti lake is literally a crater in the Askja volcano. Askja translates to “hell,” but don’t worry, the water temperature hovers around an approachable 77°F.

The name also reflects the violent eruptions that once took place in this region. Viti has a 1,000-foot diameter and was formed after a huge eruption in the 1700s. Perhaps even more impressive is its vibrant blue water, which gets its striking color from the geothermal activity in the area. Bathing in this Iceland steam pool, surrounded by a volcanic landscape, makes for quite a sight!

Viti, hot lakes in Iceland

15. Viti, one of Iceland’s most popular bathing lakes

Unlike some of the other Iceland thermal pools, Viti is only safely accessible in the summer months. During the rest of the year, the risk of snowmelt and avalanches is too great. Plus, the 100-foot descent to the caldera can get quite muddy.

That said, visiting Lake Viti is worthwhile since it is such an impressive place. For most people, it’s a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to bathe in a volcanic crater. Be sure to rent a 4×4 to get there, since you’ll have to take F-88, which often has notorious conditions. Better yet, take this tour from Mývatn, which can get you there safely. You’ll have to walk a bit to reach Viti, but it’s worth it.

16. Krauma, a modern seaside resort in Iceland

Krauma is a geothermal spa in Iceland that will have you feeling like you’re in the lap of luxury. The resort uses water from the Deildartunguhver thermal spring in nearby Reykholtsdalur, which has one of the highest flow rates in Europe. These waters are a scalding 207°F, but the resort mixes in cool water from the Rauðsgil river so people can bathe.

I recommend Krauma to anyone who is looking for hot pools in Iceland that achieve a perfect balance of nature and modern comfort. Krauma’s waters have natural origins, although the location is very polished and upscale.

Krauma, Iceland pools geothermal

16. Krauma, a modern seaside resort in Iceland

At this spa, there are six thermal pools. Five are them contain hot water, while the last one is filled with cold water, so you can boost your blood circulation. There are also steam rooms and saunas, several of which use essential oils for aromatherapy. After you’re done soaking, you can go to the relaxation room and sit by the fireplace while listening to spa music. It’s truly a complete experience!

I recommend visiting the Krauma hot springs in Iceland in winter to give you a nice break from the bitter cold. Krauma is in Reykholt, which is about 60 miles from Reykjavík. The easiest way to get there is by taking the Ring Road to Route 50 and following the signs for Krauma.

17. Kvika, Iceland’s thermal foot bath

I wanted to include a somewhat unusual option to the list of Iceland thermal pools. The Kvika foot baths are at the northern tip of the Seltjarnarnes Peninsula, on the outer limits of Reykjavík. There, you will find the Grótta lighthouse, which has stood there since 1897, and the lesser-known Kvika geothermal foot spa.

This little hot spring spa in Iceland was created by Ólöf Nordal, an Icelandic visual artist. Built during 2004-2005, this small foot pool encourages visitors to become one with nature by soaking their feet and feeling the earth’s heat radiate through their bodies. Besides that, it just feels very nice to soak your tired feet after a long day of walking!

Kvika, foot hot baths Iceland

17. Kvika, Iceland’s thermal foot bath

The water, which originates from a well, is about 102°F. This geothermal pool in Iceland is just big enough for two people to sit on the edge and dip their legs in, but it makes for a serene experience. As you let your feet warm up, you can take in the sights of the Faxafloi Bay.

Afterward, feel free to walk around the peninsula and view the city of Esja, as well as the Snæfellsjökull glacier. Kvika is also a great spot to see the Northern Lights in Iceland.

18. Krosslaug, a natural pool in Iceland for the family

Krosslaug is one of the free hot springs in Iceland that I recommend visiting if you’re with family. It’s in the Reykir region of Lundareikjadalur in the western part of the island. The baths sit about 165 feet above the road, so you get a nice view of the natural surroundings.

This small Iceland lagoon can accommodate four people maximum, so it’s a good spot for spending some quality time with loved ones. The water temperature hovers around 108°F, which feels quite nice in the bitter winter months. There aren’t any changing rooms or facilities here, but that’s part of the charm. Krosslaug is a historic geothermal pool tucked away in the hills.

Krosslaug, Iceland hot tubs

18. Krosslaug, a natural pool in Iceland for the family

The history surrounding this pool makes it one of the most popular hot springs in west Iceland. A nearby sign claims that in the year 1,000, men were baptized in this hot spring, and Krosslaug literally translates to “the Hot Pool of the Cross.” For this reason, many people today still believe that the pool contains blessed waters that may aid in healing.

If you want to see Krosslaug for yourself, journey down the Ring Road until you reach Route 50. Follow this road until you can merge onto Route 52, which will take you to the hot spring.

19. Pollurinn Hot Pool, a thermal pool in Iceland with views of the fjords

If you want to see the best hot spring in Iceland’s Westfjords, look no further than Pollurinn. This geothermal pool stands out for its incredible views of the Tálknafjörður fjord. These pools have no entrance fee, so feel free to mingle and enjoy the relaxing scenery.

The Pollurinn lagoons in Iceland are three geothermal pools ranging in temperature from 97°F to 104°F. Even though they’re free, they are still well-maintained, thanks to the residents of Tálknafjörður, who volunteer their time to keep the grounds well-kept. Due to Pollurinn’s location in the Highlands, the hot springs are rarely crowded with tourists, so it’s a peaceful stop along your route.

Pollurinn Hot Pool, thermal spa Iceland

19. Pollurinn Hot Pool, a thermal pool in Iceland with views of the fjords

Not only that, but there is free parking nearby, as well as changing rooms and a shower. So, this is a wonderful place to go if you’re traveling with family or kids. Everyone can have some time to relax and enjoy, and you don’t have to worry about finding a place to change clothes or park. For those who enjoy hiking, there are walking paths and trails nearby, so you can get lovely views of the mountains.

To get to this famous hot spring in Iceland, take Route 617 from Tálknafjörður and continue until you see the pools.

20. Reykjafjarđarlaug Hot Pot, another free thermal pool in Iceland

The Reykjafjarðarlaug hot pot is located near the Hellulaug geothermal bath in Iceland, which I mentioned earlier. Reykjafjarðarlaug is another great hot spring in the Westfjords. More specifically, it’s part of a larger fjord called Arnarfjörður and you can find it between the towns of Þingeyri and Ísafjörður.

Reykjafjarðarlaug is right along the shoreline and offers clear views of the beach and the sea. It’s also one of the free hot springs in Iceland, so it’s a good choice for those who are on a budget. Next to the thermal bath, there is a larger swimming pool, although the water temperature is not the most comfortable during the winter months. Fortunately, the hot spring’s waters reach about 104°F, so you can get cozy and enjoy a nice soak.

Reykjafjarðarlaug Hot Pot, free hot springs Iceland

20. Reykjafjarđarlaug Hot Pot, another free thermal pool in Iceland

There are some small changing rooms here, but no showers, so you should arrive to Reykjafjarðarlaug freshly clean to avoid contaminating the water. Since it is in the Westfjords, there aren’t too many visitors, so you’re not likely to run into crowds.

In terms of getting there, the easiest way is to drive from the town of Bíldudalur and merging onto Route 63. Not everyone is interested in going into the Highlands, but it’s worth it to see one of the best hot springs in west Iceland.

21. Hveravellir, a beautiful place to enjoy hot springs in Iceland

The natural pool of Hveravellir is considered one of the most beautiful Iceland mineral pools because of its surrounding landscapes. It’s technically part of the Hveravellir Nature Reserve, which is nestled between two impressive glaciers, Langjökull and Hofsjökull.

Even with its more remote location in the Highlands, Hveravellir is one of the best geothermal pools in Iceland and is popular among locals and tourists. Therefore, if you’re going to visit during the high season, I recommend arriving early to avoid the crowds. The pool can accommodate only 20 people, so you want to give yourself the opportunity to thoroughly enjoy it.

Hveravellir, geothermal hot springs Iceland

21. Hveravellir, a beautiful place to enjoy hot springs in Iceland

It’s also worth noting that this hot spring in Iceland has one of the most variable water temperatures. The bath can range from 64°F to 102°F, but I still think it’s well worth visiting so you can enjoy the natural beauty in this area.

To get there, you will need a 4×4 since you’ll have to drive on the F-35 from the Ring Road.

22. Hörgshliđ Hot Pot, thermal baths with views of glaciers and mountains

The Hörgshliđ Hot Pot is a geothermal pool in Iceland that stands out for its beautiful views of glaciers and mountains. The bathing environment is pleasant, calm, and relaxing. Located in the Westfjords, it is easy to find thanks to the green shed on the side of the road.

Hörgshliđ is one of the most unique hot springs in east Iceland because it’s owned by the farmers at Hörgshliđ farm (hence the name). In fact, I suggest you ask permission before bathing in the pool. From my experience, Icelanders are very friendly, so they won’t refuse your request.

Hörgshlíð Hot Pot, thermal hot springs Iceland

22. Hörgshliđ Hot Pot, thermal baths with views of glaciers and mountains

The small, rectangular pool sits on the pebbled shores of Mjóifjörður and looks out over the waters of the fjord. Three hoses maintain the flow of water into the pool; two are hot and one is cold. This keeps the water temperature at a comfortable 104°F.

While this is one of the simpler hot water pools in Iceland, it is quite pleasant and quaint. There is even a small changing room where you can change your clothes in privacy.

If you come here between May and September, you can access the nearby camping area at Hólmavík. Otherwise, simply enjoy the natural beauty and glacial landscapes.

23. Landbrotalaug, one of the most romantic hot springs in Iceland

Landbrotalaug is considered one of the most romantic natural thermal pools in Iceland. Nestled behind an old farm on the northern Snaefellsnes peninsula, there is a small pond with two hot pots at either end. Both are fed by a small hose that keeps the water temperature between 95°F and 104°F.

Many people agree that this is one of the top hot springs in Iceland for couples. The pools are just big enough to accommodate two people, and the intimate location allows people to have their privacy. In fact, lots of people choose to skinny-dip here, so be mindful of that when you arrive.

Landbrotalaug, natural hot springs Iceland

23. Landbrotalaug, one of the most romantic hot springs in Iceland

Also, the moss-covered walkway leading to the pools can be slippery, so be careful. There is free parking nearby, but no changing rooms or showers. Still, the beautiful scenery and romantic feeling of the place makes it one of the best hot springs near Reykjavík.

To get there, you can take the Ring Road from Reykjavík and travel towards Borgarnes. After you pass the exit for Route 55, turn left onto a small path. You’ll have to turn left onto another path, which leads to the Landbrotalaug baths. The total trip takes about 2 hours from Reykjavík.

24. Grettislaug, the thermal pool where an Icelandic hero bathed

Grettislaug is a famous hot spring in Iceland named after the country’s most famous hero, Grettir. His story dates back to the 1200s and involves a valiant fight against a draugr, which is basically a Norse zombie. It is said that Grettir bathed in the waters of this hot spring every evening, hence the name Grettislaug.

The water temperature varies slightly but hovers around 104°F. Unlike most of the other thermal hot springs in Iceland, Grettislaug is on private land, so you’ll have to pay an entrance fee. Even so, the facilities are comfortable and include private changing rooms and showers.

Grettislaug, thermal pools in Iceland

24. Grettislaug, the thermal pool where an Icelandic hero bathed

The views are also quite impressive since the baths are along the Skagafjörður shore. While you relax, you can observe the surrounding mountains and nearby Drangey Island. A visit to the island isn’t complete without seeing this geothermal pool in Iceland, which preserves the region’s Viking history.

Grettislaug is on the Skagafjörður Peninsula in northern Iceland, which you can access from the Ring Road. Turn onto Route 75 to Sauðárkrókur and take Route 744 until you reach the exit for Route 748. Then, continue on this road until you see the hot springs.

25. Guđrúnarlaug, a natural pool with an authentic Viking history

Guđrúnarlaug is another spring in Iceland with Viking roots. Located in west Iceland, Guđrúnarlaug is the hot spring from a famous Icelandic saga called Laxdæla Saga. It tells the story of a 10th-century love triangle between the beautiful Icelandic woman Guðrún Ósvífrsdóttir and two infatuated men. The Guđrúnarlaug spring is located in the same place described in the story.

Given its legendary status, Guđrúnarlaug is one of the most popular thermal baths in Iceland. Even without its claim to fame, these hot springs near Sælingsdalur are lovely. The water temperature is about 99°F, perfect for bathing at any time of the year. Also, the peaceful landscape surrounding the pool have a magical air about them.

Guðrúnarlaug, hot springs Iceland free

25. Guđrúnarlaug, a natural pool with an authentic Viking history

You can take a dip in this small Icelandic geothermal spa for free. There are also changing rooms for your convenience.

To get there from Reykjavík, drive north on Ring Road until you reach Route 60. Follow this road and then turn left at Sælingsdalsvegur. Continue driving until you arrive at the Edda Hotel in Laugar, where you can park your car. You’ll have to walk a bit to reach the pool, but it’s worth it.

26. Kerlingarfjöll, lovely hot springs in Iceland

Kerlingarfjöll is one of the most beautiful natural Iceland springs to enjoy. It is in the Central Highlands as part of the Kerlingarfjöll Mountains. The 10,000-year-old mountain range features a volcanic peak with an elevation of nearly 4,850 feet.

Due to their proximity to an active volcano, these Iceland thermal pools reach a soothing water temperature ranging from 93°F to 99°F. Kerlingarfjöll is nestled in a small valley, less than a mile away from a nearby hotel. A well-kept walking path leads to the hot spring, which can accommodate between 10 and 15 people.

Kerlingarfjöll, thermal baths Iceland

26. Kerlingarfjöll, lovely hot springs in Iceland

The area of Kerlingarfjöll is a haven for hikers, and there are several hiking trails you can follow. They will take you between mountains, valleys, and glaciers to some of the most picturesque landscapes on the island. Soaking in the thermal waters of Kerlingarfjöll will be just what your body wants after a long hike.

The easiest way to find this natural bath in Iceland is to travel from Gullfoss. Keep in mind that you will need a 4×4 since you’ll be traveling along some F-roads in the Highlands. From Gullfoss, take F-35 to Kerlingarfjöll and follow the signs to the parking area.

27. Laugarfell, a quiet hot spring in Iceland

You can find Laugarfell in eastern Iceland, north of Mount Snæfell. These hot springs in Iceland provide a tranquil refuge, and the waters are said to have healing powers. Of course, it’s difficult to prove the validity of these claims, but one thing is certain: a bath in these pools will reinvigorate you!

Not only is the water temperature a pleasant 93°F; this geothermal pool in Iceland is surrounded by a spectacular landscape. While bathing in the steamy waters, you can spot free-roaming reindeer. Laugarfell is also close to lovely waterfalls, so I recommend this hot spring if you want a relaxing soak in a natural, secluded area. With views of the majestic Hofsjokull and Vatnajokull glaciers, this is a place to totally disconnect and unwind.

Laugarfell, Iceland warm springs

27. Laugarfell, a quiet hot spring in Iceland

Since it is in the Highlands, this geothermal pool is only open during the summer months when the F-roads are safer to maneuver. To make the most of your time here, I suggest staying at the Laugarfell Accommodation & Hot Springs hotel. An overnight stay will allow you to take full advantage of one of the best natural hot springs in Iceland as well as the nearby hiking paths.

On a final note, remember that these hot springs are often confused with those of Laugafell, which is a 6-hour drive away, in northern Iceland.

28. Fosslaug, a free hot spring in Iceland to enjoy a bath

Fosslaug is one of the best natural hot baths in Iceland that will soothe your body and spirit. Its prime location on the banks of the Huseyjarkvisl River makes it one of the most popular spots for tourists. The hot spring is next to the striking Reykjafoss waterfall, which is undoubtedly one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Iceland.

Not only that, but Fosslaug is free to access, and there is a small parking lot about 10 minutes away. Once you’re done admiring the roaring waters of the Reykjafoss waterfall, you can walk over a charming little footbridge to a grassy area. This Iceland steam pool is encircled by stones and boasts a water temperature of 104°F.

Fosslaug, hot springs Iceland free

28. Fosslaug, a free hot spring in Iceland to enjoy a bath

As you take some time for a calming bath, you can hear the waterfall in the distance. Also, if you get too steamy in the pool, you can take a quick dip in the nearby river to cool off. One thing I will say is that since this is one of the hot springs in Iceland’s countryside, don’t expect fancy changing rooms or showers. I have no doubt you’ll be just fine without them!

To get to Fosslaug, simply travel north on the Ring Road to Varmahlíð before turning onto Route 752.

29. Nauteyri, another hot spring in Iceland you can bathe in

Nauteyri is another spring in Iceland where you can enjoy a lovely bath in a relaxing atmosphere. It’s in Súðavík in the Westfjords, so it’s not the easiest to find. Yet, this also means that it’s usually nice and quiet. The waters of this Iceland pool range between 108°F and 110°F, so it gets quite steamy.

A few years ago, a fish company nearly destroyed Nauteyri by drilling a fish hatchery near the spring, stopping the flow of water. Fortunately, the problem was solved by connecting a hose to some pipes. I’m glad this hot spring is still functioning, as it’s one of the most idyllic natural pools in the Westfjords. It’s also popular with locals, and it isn’t hard to see why.

Nauteyri, beautiful thermal baths in Iceland

29. Nauteyri, another hot spring in Iceland you can bathe in

Nauteyri is surrounded by picturesque lakes and rivers and is in a peaceful location away from the main road. Those who can manage to find it are rewarded with a restful bath in one of the best geothermal hot springs in Iceland.

The steam pool is about 45 minutes from Hörgshliđ, and you’ll need a 4×4 to navigate the gravel roads. Take Route 61 to the Route 635 exit and keep driving until you pass a small café. Then, look for signs indicating a water protection area. The bath should be close by, behind a hill.

30. Gvendarlaug í Bjarnarfirđi, a geothermal bath in Iceland you should visit

Gvendarlaug í Bjarnarfirđi is the only known hot spring in Iceland’s Westfjords to have been blessed by Bishop Guðmundur Arason the Good in the 13th century. For this reason, many locals believe that the pool’s waters have healing powers. However, this thermal lagoon is only for visiting since bathing isn’t allowed.

Fortunately, a new geothermal pool was built near the original, and you can bathe in this one. Gvendarlaug is well-known for its pristine natural beauty and magical ambiance. Fittingly, the hot spring is near the Museum of Icelandic Sorcery and Witchcraft. With an average temperature of 106°F, you can see bubbles forming towards the center of the hot pot.

Gvendarlaug í Bjarnarfirði, geothermal springs Iceland

30. Gvendarlaug í Bjarnarfirđi, a geothermal bath in Iceland you should visit

Next to this small Iceland natural bath is an 80-foot swimming pool. Known as Gvendarlaug hins góða (“The Pool of Gvendur the Good”), it has a water temperature of 99°F. It is community property, so there is a small entrance fee.

Gvendarlaug is in Bjarnarfjörður, so the simplest way to get there is from Drangsnes. Take Route 645 until you get to the Route 643 exit. This is one of the best thermal pools in Iceland, so it’s definitely worth the trip.

Iceland hot springs map

To make it easier for you to locate all the natural thermal pools I’ve described in this guide, as well as a few others, here’s a map of hot springs in Iceland.

Download this free hot springs in Iceland map and other Iceland tourist maps here.

Also, if you decide to enjoy a bath in any of these geothermal springs in Iceland, remember to leave the area, including the changing room, just as you found it. Part of being a responsible traveler is treating the place you’re visiting with respect, and it’ll allow future tourists to enjoy the baths in comfort.

Now that you know all the best hot baths in Iceland, I wish you safe and happy travels. Enjoy Iceland and its natural thermal pools!

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COFOUNDER & TRAVEL JUNKIE

Hi, I'm Ascen, a globetrotter based in Philadelphia, USA. I enjoy exploring new landscapes and creating in-depth travel guides for Capture the Atlas.

I have felt a special connection with nature and all the inhabitants of the planet since I was a kid. I am passionate about discovering new countries and especially their wildlife, but no matter how many places I visit, I will always belong to the remote beaches of Almería, in Southern Spain.

You can know a little more about me here.

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